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Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Risk Assessment - our state-of-the-art, CLIA certified and COLA accredited facilities perform Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) based screening for mutations known to affect an individual’s risk of developing hereditary cancer.  Results from the Hereditary Cancer Screening test enables physicians to make better informed treatment decisions.

Heriditary  cancer (dna) testing

HEREDITARY or 

PREDISPOSITION CANCER GENOMICS

Molecular testing looks for specific inherited changes (mutations) in a person’s genetic make-up. Genetic mutations may have multiple different effects on a patient’s health. Mutations that are harmful may increase a person’s chance, or risk, of developing a disease such as cancer. Inherited mutations are thought to play a role in 5-10% of all cancers. These particular conditions are considered hereditary and appropriate genetic testing may be used to determine an individual’s risk.

 

Some people inherit mutation(s) in the germline, allowing for the mutations to be passed on from their parents and to their children. There are two classes of cellular genes: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

 

Often, multiple genetic mutations in a single individual are responsible for the development of hereditary cancers.

Cancer is a disorder in which the normal control of cell growth is lost, causing abnormal proliferation of the affected cells. Inherited genetic mutations may increase a patient’s risk of developing cancer through numerous mechanisms, depending on the aberrant functions of the mutated parent gene. Mutations in genes involved in mismatched repair of damaged DNA are particularly likely to lead to a higher cancer risk.

COMMON HEREDITARY CANCERS

AND CANCER SYNDROMES

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Lynch Syndrome (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM)

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Colon Cancer (APC, BMPR1A, EPCAM)

Uterine Cancer (MLH1, MSH2, EPCAM, MSH6, PMS2)

Endometrial Cancer (EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6)

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Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (TP53)

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Breast and Ovarian Cancer (BRCA1, BRCA2)

CANDIDATES FOR 

CGx TESTING

MEMBER OF AN AT-RISK

ETHNIC POPULATION

 While this increased risk could be due to a variety of factors such as diet and cigarette smoking, a growing body of evidence suggests that a significant portion of the increased risk of pancreatic cancer in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent has a genetic basis. 

FAMILY HISTORY OF CANCER

If one of your family members, however distant, has been diagnosed with cancer, there is a chance that you inherited a gene mutation that not only increases your personal risk of developing cancer, but may also be passed on to your offspring—potentially increasing their risk of developing cancer.